Spanish Imperial eagle


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JAN FEB MAR APR MAY JUN JUL AUG SEP OCT NOV DEC
THREAT CATEGORY
CNEA CAEA LRAE LRVA
EN EN EN CR
WHERE TO SEE IT
HUELVA SEVILLA CÓRDOBA JAÉN
H-1 SE-1 CO-1 J-1
H-2 SE-2 CO-2 J-2
H-3 SE-3 CO-3 J-3
H-4 SE-4 CO-4 J-4
H-5 SE-5 CO-5 J-5
H-6 SE-6 CO-6 J-6
H-7 SE-7 CO-7 J-7
H-8 SE-8 CO-8 J-8
H-9 SE-9 CO-9 J-9
H-10 SE-10 CO-10 J-10
H-11 SE-11 CO-11 J-11
H-12 SE-12 CO-12 J-12
H-13 SE-13 CO-13 J-13
H-14 SE-14 CO-14 J-14
H-15 SE-15 CO-15 J-15
H-16
H-17
STATUS
Sedentary, with some vagrant birds. 

ABUNDANCE
Sierra Morena boasts Andalusia’s biggest population of this species (over 50 pairs). There is also an indeterminate number of immature non-breeders.

HABITAT
Associated above all with Mediterranean woodland, needing thinly wooded, prey-rich areas (rabbits above all). In its pre adult stage it prefers more open countryside of pastureland, pseudosteppe, campiña and other treeless areas.

SEASONAL BEHAVIOUR
Year round presence. From September onwards numbers are swollen by young birds from other areas, who then remain for varying periods. 

DISTRIBUTION
A patchy distribution through our study area and its hinterland. Non breeder in Sierra de Aracena y Picos de Aroche and rare as a vagrant, turning up regularly only in a few areas like Sierra Pelada. Sierra Morena Sevillana is probably the best area, with about 15 breeding pairs, the number growing almost year by year; also a prime natal dispersal site (steppes and plains of Guadalcanal). Sierra Morena Cordobesa has 12 breeding pairs, most in the nature parks Sierra de Cardeña and Montoro and Sierra de Hornachuelos and roundabout. Sierra Morena de Jaén has the lion’s share with about 25 fairly scattered pairs, including some areas of very high density like Jándula valley.

COMMENTS
This flagship species is one of the best studied in Sierra Morena. The Regional Environment Department of Andalusia is currently carrying out many conservation projects, ranging from official surveys and pair monitoring to supplementary feeding and reconstruction of collapsing nests. Far-reaching agreements are also signed with landowners to boost the rabbit population and manage the habitat, with a beneficial knock-on effect for many other Mediterranean woodland species (Iberian Lynx, other big raptors, etc).

THREATS
Although listed in the national scheme as “In Danger of Extinction” this species is currently doing well in Andalusia, with constantly growing numbers. It is still beset by several threats, however, such as power-line electrocution, illegal use of poisons and falling nests in flimsy trees such as Eucalyptus.