Great Spotted Cuckoo


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JAN FEB MAR APR MAY JUN JUL AUG SEP OCT NOV DEC
THREAT CATEGORY
CNEA CAEA LRAE LRVA
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WHERE TO SEE IT
HUELVA SEVILLA C脫RDOBA JA脡N
H-1 SE-1 CO-1 J-1
H-2 SE-2 CO-2 J-2
H-3 SE-3 CO-3 J-3
H-4 SE-4 CO-4 J-4
H-5 SE-5 CO-5 J-5
H-6 SE-6 CO-6 J-6
H-7 SE-7 CO-7 J-7
H-8 SE-8 CO-8 J-8
H-9 SE-9 CO-9 J-9
H-10 SE-10 CO-10 J-10
H-11 SE-11 CO-11 J-11
H-12 SE-12 CO-12 J-12
H-13 SE-13 CO-13 J-13
H-14 SE-14 CO-14 J-14
H-15 SE-15 CO-15 J-15
H-16
H-17
STATUS
Summer visitor and migrant. 

ABUNDANCE
Scarce in general though locally common.

HABITAT
Lives in Mediterranean woodland in general, usually in scrub with scattered trees (especially pines), though also occurs in broom scrub, pastureland, clearings in pinewoods, etc.

SEASONAL BEHAVIOUR
This is one of the first migrants back from Africa, sometimes as early as December (though most arrive in February). They also leave early; most adults disappear by May-June, though young birds may hang on until September. 

DISTRIBUTION
Extremely scarce in Huelva, seen only in some areas of Encinasola, where it possibly breeds. Patchy distribution in the other provinces; in Seville, for example, it frequents the pseudosteppe of Guadalcanal and the catchment area of the Rivera de Onza; in C贸rdoba seen in northern Sierra de Hornachuelos, the dehesas of Espiel and the pinewoods of Villaviciosa de C贸rdoba; in Ja茅n relatively numerous in J谩ndula valley.

COMMENTS
Like the Cuckoo, the Great Spotted Cuckoo is a brood parasite, laying its eggs in the nests of other birds, mainly crow species and especially Magpies. Logically, therefore, its range more or less shadows that of its main host victim, the Magpie itself.