Long-Eared Owl


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JAN FEB MAR APR MAY JUN JUL AUG SEP OCT NOV DEC
THREAT CATEGORY
CNEA CAEA LRAE LRVA
- - - -
WHERE TO SEE IT
HUELVA SEVILLA CÓRDOBA JAÉN
H-1 SE-1 CO-1 J-1
H-2 SE-2 CO-2 J-2
H-3 SE-3 CO-3 J-3
H-4 SE-4 CO-4 J-4
H-5 SE-5 CO-5 J-5
H-6 SE-6 CO-6 J-6
H-7 SE-7 CO-7 J-7
H-8 SE-8 CO-8 J-8
H-9 SE-9 CO-9 J-9
H-10 SE-10 CO-10 J-10
H-11 SE-11 CO-11 J-11
H-12 SE-12 CO-12 J-12
H-13 SE-13 CO-13 J-13
H-14 SE-14 CO-14 J-14
H-15 SE-15 CO-15 J-15
H-16
H-17
STATUS
Breeder that is probably not completely sedentary after the end of the breeding season. 

ABUNDANCE
Very scarce in nearly the whole region though in some areas it may be classed as only uncommon.

HABITAT
Open pinewoods and Holm-Oak woods, patches of scrub with scattered trees, campiña and isolated copses. Also recorded in riverside copses and urban parks. Takes over the old nests of other birds, especially crow species.

SEASONAL BEHAVIOUR
Unknown. The best time for detecting it is in May when the fledglings are begging for food. 

DISTRIBUTION
In the last three seasons its breeding has been proven in Llanos de Guaditoca, around the Santuario de la Virgen de la Cabeza and the campiña straddling Córdoba and Jaén. Nonetheless it is also likely to be present in other suitable areas of all four provinces.

COMMENTS
This nocturnal species is rarely seen and hardly heard, so it is difficult to study. The best way of detecting its presence in any area is to listen out in May and June for the newly fledged chicks squeaking incessantly for food. We know of one recent case of nesting in a human construction (in a raven’s nest inside a medieval tower, in the campiña of Montoro).